6 International Beauty Editors Share the Top Trends in Their Countries

1/7 Shutterstock

Sit back, relax, and let WH's international editors take you on a tour-torial of the coolest hair, skin, and makeup trends in their countries. Plus: quick how-tos for re-creating them from the comfort of your own home.

2/7 Photograph courtesy of Pangesti Bernardus
First Stop: Indonesia

Local Trend: Rice as Skin Smoother
Rice is a staple here—and not just for the diet. "We have a tradition of using rice to make lulur, which means 'exfoliating paste,'" says Pangesti Bernardus, WH Indonesia editor-in-chief. "As a formal ritual, it's done 40 days before a wedding." At a spa, the traditional Javanese lulur—a yellowish-brown paste with a spicy floral scent—is smeared all over the body. "Once the paste is dry, it is gently rubbed off to slough away dead cells," says Bernardus.

Copy it: Get out your mortar and pestle, girl: "The lulur paste is made from a blend of finely milled rice, nuts, turmeric root, ginger, cinnamon, and sandalwood powder, and ground together with a little water," says Bernardus.

Or make it easy: Rice scrubs now come premade! Try Rituals Rice Scrub ($17, rituals.com). Once a month, apply and let it dry a bit, then rub in circular motions beginning at your feet and working up your bod. Rinse off.

3/7 Photograph courtesy of Larissa Serpa
Second Stop: Brazil

Local Trend: Ombré Brows
"We lose hair as we get older, and voluminous brows are associated with a younger look," says Larissa Serpa, WH Brazil beauty reporter. "Brazilians are obsessed with youth, so we're hooked. Ombré fills in the brows in a natural-looking way so it's not one solid block of color." The hue is lightest on the hairs closest to the nose and darkens as it gets to the brow arch.

Copy it: "In Brazil, we love the 3-D Technique, which uses semipermanent tattoo ink that creates a shadow under the real hairs in a very soft way," says Serpa.

To DIY, might we recommend makeup? (So much easier to fix if a hand bobbles.) You'll need an angled brow brush and two colors—one that matches your lightest brow hairs, one a bit darker. Apply the paler hue from inner corners to first third of brows; start the darker shade on the arch. Use a brow spoolie where the colors meet. Try L'Oreal Paris Brow Stylist Prep & Shape Pro-Kit ($15, at drugstores).

4/7 Photograph courtesy of Yi-Hwa Hanna
Third Stop: The Middle East

Local Trend: Oudh Diffusing 
"Women here love their perfume, and oudh scents are some of the most popular," says Yi-Hwa Hanna, WH Middle East editor-in-chief. "Oudh is burned wood from the agarwood tree, which has a musky aroma, and many women will light their oudh in beautiful burners and waft the scent over their clothing," says Hanna.

Copy it: Stock up on fragranced wood chips (called bakhoor in Arabic) and a burner. Try Mohavy Vintage Wood Agarwood Chips ($19, mohavy.com) and Bakhoor Burner by Mukhallat ($176, mukhallat.com). Place a lit piece of coal in the burner, then wrap aluminum foil over the coal and poke holes in it. Stick a handful of chips onto the foil. "The scent is meant to make everything fragrant," says Hanna. Spritz on an oudh fragrance, like Bond No. 9 New York Oud ($270, bondno9.com), a mix of patchouli, musk, and vetiver.

5/7 Photograph courtesy of Anja Joubert
Fourth Stop: South Africa

Local Trend: Rooibos Tea
South African women swear by the anti-aging, super-healthy powers of rooibos tea in their bevs and baths. "It's filled with antioxidants," says Anja Joubert, WH South Africa beauty director. On the drink front, "rooibos tea is definitely an acquired taste—I didn't like it at first. Adding honey or lemon or both can add some sweetness and cut the bitterness." Regarding the tea as tub toy, the earthy scent is pleasant, but skin softening and soothing are the true perks.

Copy it: "Put at least two or three bags of the tea into a bowl with boiling water—the hotter the water, the faster and better the tea will release," says Joubert. "After it has steeped for five to eight minutes, add that mix, tea bags and all, into your bathwater." Try The Republic of Tea Cedarberg Organic African Rooibos Red Tea ($10, republicoftea.com).

6/7 Photograph courtesy of Anna Maria Papiri
Fifth Stop: Greece

Local Trend: Dark Eyes
"In ancient Greek history, Venus, the goddess of love, was the beauty ideal," says Anna Maria Papiri, WH Greece beauty editor. "The eyes were the focus, and they used black color—from walnuts or antimony, a mineral found in nature—for shaping and toning their brows and lashes, and black kohl for lining eyes."

Copy it: Greek women circa 2016 are equally obsessed with smudgy eyes. Use a black kohl pencil—Papiri likes Lancôme Le Crayon Khol in Black Ebony ($26, lancome-usa.com)—to rim top and bottom lashes. Next, sweep a grayish-taupe cream shadow onto lids and into creases. Try Shiseido Shimmering Cream Eye Color in Fog ($25, shiseido.com). Finally, loads of black mascara. Papiri's latest fave: Maybelline New York The Colossal Chaotic Lash Mascara in Blackest Black ($8, at drugstores).

7/7 Photograph courtesy of Vivi Hu
Sixth Stop: China

Local Trend: Solid Shampoo
"For decades, Chinese women relied on solids to wash their hair. But this tradition was interrupted by the introduction of liquid shampoos, and many strayed," says Vivi Hu, WH China executive editor-in-chief. "But now, Chinese people are pursuing more natural treatments in every aspect of their lives." Because these fresh bars tend to be free of harsh ingredients, Hu finds they leave hair shinier and smoother. But there's more: "One of the outstanding features is that you stimulate the hair follicles, because you're massaging it in more than you would with a liquid, which can help maximize hair growth."

Copy it: Rub the bar between your hands with water, work the lather gently and thoroughly into wet hair, then rinse away. Hu says one light lather is usually enough. Try Lush Honey I Washed My Hair Shampoo Bar ($10, lushusa.com).

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